Central Valley Flood Protection Board

The Central Valley Flood Protection Board (CVFPB) is the State regulatory agency responsible for ensuring that appropriate standards are met for the construction, maintenance, and protection of the flood control system that protects life, property, and wildlife habitat in California’s vast and diverse Central Valley from the devastating effects of flooding. CVFPB issues encroachment permits and works with other agencies to improve the flood protection structures, enforces removal of problematic encroachments, and keeps watch over the Central Valley’s continually improving flood management system.

Upcoming Meetings

 

Notice of Proposed Rulemaking – Permit and Inspection Fees

 

NEWS & HIGHLIGHTS

Honoring two key people for their work:

Man behind the snow pack survey set to retire

Year in and year out, Californians have become accustomed to the man in the snow. Frank Gehrke has walked through a Sierra meadow during the past 30 years to educate the public about the snow pack. Now, he is retiring. Click here to read more.

 

UCLA Scientist honored by DWR for Large Storm Forecasting Efforts in Conjunction with NASA

UCLA Scientist Dr. Bin Guan is the Department of Water Resources (DWR) 2018 Climate Science Service Award honoree for his tool that identifies atmospheric rivers in weather models. Click on here to read more.

 


CRS Report: Water Infrastructure Improvements for the Nation (WIIN) Act: Bureau of Reclamation and California Water Provisions

From mavensnotebook.com – This report discusses selected provisions enacted under Subtitle J of the WIIN Act. It provides background and context related to selected drought- and water-related provisions, summarizes the changes authorized in the WIIN Act, and discusses issues and questions that Congress may consider. (more)


Let it flow: In about-face, state breaks and shifts levees to restore natural floodplains

From CALmatters – At the confluence of the San Joaquin and Tuolumne rivers, a winter of heavy rains could inundate about 1,200 acres of riverside woodland for the first time in 60 years. That’s by design: Here, a few miles west of Modesto, work crews removed or broke several miles of levee last spring and replanted the land with tens of thousands of native sapling trees and shrubs. “We are very eager to see what happens when there is some overbank flooding here,” said Julie Rentner, executive vice president of River Partners, a habitat restoration group that is directing the project, known as the Dos Rios Ranch Preserve. The work, much of it conducted by the California Conservation Corps, comes as the state overhauls its approach toward flood control, with a growing emphasis on reconnecting floodplains to rivers so they can absorb floodwaters. This shift in methodology marks a U-turn from past reliance on levees to protect cities and towns. (more)


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