Front Page News:

The Flood Management Revolution in California You’ve Never Heard Of

Sacramento BEE, Opinion by John Carlon, River Partners – California’s rivers have bestowed many gifts – water, abundant agriculture, transportation, recreation and wildlife – and have shaped our history. But we haven’t always treated our rivers well in return. In the first 150 years of statehood, Californians built thousands of miles of levees that eliminated natural floodplains and reduced Central Valley wetlands by 95 percent. Fortunately over the past 20 years, creative partnerships have worked with nature, restoring floodplains that reduce flood risk and provide new habitat for birds, fish, mammals and reptiles. In a state famous for fighting over water, we’ve learned that restoring rivers and floodplains is good for all Californians. (more)


FloodMAR: Using floodwaters for groundwater recharge

From mavensnotebooks.comFlood-MAR is an integrated water resource management strategy that uses flood waters resulting from rainfall or snowmelt for managed aquifer recharge on agricultural lands and working landscapes. Flood-MAR can also be implemented at multiple scales, from individual landowners diverting flood water with existing infrastructure to using extensive detention/recharge areas and modernizing flood management infrastructure and operations. With the implementation of the Sustainable Groundwater Management Act as well as the effects of climate change necessitating changes in how water is managed in California, Flood Managed Aquifer Recharge, or Flood-MAR, potentially presents a sustainable strategy that can simultaneously accommodate longer and deeper droughts along with more severe and frequent flooding. (more)


Hardworking Mokelumne Wins Wild & Scenic River Status

From courthousenews.com – Racing and snaking down remote canyons lined with pine trees and jagged granite, a long-underappreciated yet critical Sierra Nevada river hurries to the valley floor. For centuries the river’s mirror-like flows teemed with Chinook salmon and its shores hosted vibrant Native American trading markets and seasonal camps. Tucked away near stretches called Devil’s Nose and Tiger Creek, grinding stones, mortar rocks and other Indian artifacts offer subtle reminders of the past. The once free-flowing river was transformed in the 1800s, thanks to a global thirst for gold, timber and electricity. Opportunistic farmers, water suppliers and utilities replaced the Gold Rushers, staking new claims to the river torrents. (more)


CVFPB’s Inspection Section is Up and Running!

This summer, CVFPB welcomed staff engineers Michael Gill, Doug Kennedy, and Alex Haston (pictures below) to serve as “eyes and ears” in the field and ensure threats to levee safety are addressed before they become emergencies. Once encroachment permits are issued, CVFPB inspectors ensure projects are built according to the permit conditions. Additionally, the inspectors will perform routine encroachment inspections and support our permitting, enforcement, environmental, and real estate staff in the field. From our Chief of the Inspections Section, Preston Shopbell (picture to the right): “We look forward to having you meet our new inspectors in the field, and please feel free to share your knowledge and experience of the unique conditions in your area with them.”

 

 

 

 

 

 


SWRCB Should Reject Flows Plan, Coalition Says

From AgAlert – Urging the state water board to reject a proposal to redirect flows in three Central California rivers, a coalition of more than 50 agricultural, water and business organizations encouraged the board to renew efforts for voluntary agreements with affected water users. “This unified response from groups representing farmers, ranchers, and urban and rural residents alike demonstrates the impact the water board’s proposal would have, and the need for the board to explore alternative methods that would help fish without the severe human cost of its current approach,” California Farm Bureau Federation President Jamie Johansson said. (more)


U. S. Army Corps Of Engineers South Pacific Division Change Of Command

July 25, 2018 – Board President Bill Edgar, Executive Officer Leslie Gallagher, and Acting Chief Engineer Michael Wright attended USACE’s South Pacific Division Change of Command ceremony in Sausalito, California. Outgoing Commander Brigadier General Peter Helmlinger turned over the reins to incoming Commander Colonel Kimberly Colloton, whose education in Architecture, Building Science, National Resource Strategy, Civil Engineering, Command College, and Project Management, plus her vast USACE experience, responsibilities, and numerous awards has prepared her well to take on this challenging South Pacific Division. The Central Valley Flood Protection Board congratulates, welcomes, and looks forward to working with Commander Colloton.


CVFPB Helps NAFSMA Celebrate Their 40th Anniversary

Central Valley Flood Protection Board Vice-President Emma Suarez and Board Executive Officer Leslie Gallagher, who is also on NAFSMA’s Board, recently attended the organization’s 40th Anniversary and Annual Conference in Santa Fe, New Mexico. NAFSMA is a national association that, among other important goals, successfully helps flood and storm water management agencies procure government approval and funding for their projects.


California Awards $3 Billion in Water-Storage Projects

From The Wall Street Journal – The California Water Commission awarded nearly $3 billion in funding to help kick-start a range of water-storage projects, including a new reservoir in the state’s biggest such investment in a generation. A total of eight projects that would add the equivalent of a new Shasta Lake received the funding, including the proposed Sites Reservoir 75 miles northwest of Sacramento, which got about a third of the money and would be California’s first new state reservoir in decades. (more)

Another article from The Sacramento Bee: https://www.sacbee.com/latest-news/article215421995.html


Remaking Flood Management to Support Salmon

From Public Policy Institute – A Conversation with RD 108’s Lewis Bair. California’s aquatic ecosystems and the species that depend on them are in trouble. Dramatic changes in water and land use over the past 150 years have transformed the state’s freshwater landscape, and the latest drought brought additional stress. We talked with Lewis Bair, general manager of Reclamation District No. 108, about where we need to go from here. (more)


Presentation/Webinar Invitation: Watershed University | Flood-Mar: Using Floodwater For Managed Aquifer Recharge (July 24, 2018)

With the effects of climate change necessitating wholesale changes in how water is managed in California, “Flood-MAR” presents a sustainable strategy that can simultaneously accommodate longer and deeper droughts, and more severe and frequent episodic and seasonal flooding.   Flood-MAR is an integrated water resource management strategy that uses flood water resulting from, or in anticipation of, rainfall or snow melt for managed aquifer recharge on agricultural lands and working landscapes. Flood-MAR can also be implemented at multiple scales, from individual landowners diverting flood water with existing infrastructure to using extensive detention/recharge areas and modernizing flood management infrastructure and operations. (more)