Front Page News:

Yosemite Releases Dramatic Video Footage from the Weekend’s Flooding in the Valley.

From SFGATE – Heavy rain and melting snow from a warm tropical storm flooded Yosemite Valley over the weekend, covering some roads with up to 4 feet of water. The national park system released footage Wednesday showing meadows that look like lakes and raging waterfalls that sound like thunder. A swollen Merced River covered bridges and campgrounds in water. The river crested at 13.73 feet at Pohono Bridge, rising 4 feet above flood stage and inundating campgrounds, meadows and roadways. (more)


Can Agriculture And Wildlife Co-Exist? Rice Farmers Think So

From mavensnotebook.com – With more than 90 percent of California’s wetlands gone, some unlikely bedfellows are working together to bring habitat back. That dramatic change in the landscape may sound grim, but in California’s rice country, some strange bedfellows are working together to address the historic loss of wildlife habitat, and to insure rice farming is part of the solution. (more)


Reactions To Metropolitan Water District Vote To Support Full California Water Fix Project

From mavensnotebook.com – Yesterday, the Metropolitan Water District Board of Directors voted to support full construction of the California Water Fix, although nowhere near unanimously with vote shaking out to roughly 61% to 39%. Here’s what agencies and organizations had to say, beginning with Metropolitan Water District, the Governor, and then agencies and organizations in alphabetical order. (more)


Southern California Water Agency Backs 2 Delta Tunnels In Breakthrough Vote

By Dale Kasler & Ryan Sabalow, Sacramento Bee – After a decade of planning and debate, the controversial Delta tunnels project got a huge cash infusion Tuesday and took a giant step toward becoming reality. In a historic decision, the wealthy Metropolitan Water District of Southern California voted to take a majority stake in the $16.7 billion twin-tunnels project, a plan championed by Gov. Jerry Brown as a way of protecting the water supply for more than 25 million Southern California and Bay Area residents. (more)


Repaired Oroville Dam Spillway May Be Used Within a Week

From Steve Schoonover, Chico E-R News – The partially repaired main spillway at Oroville Dam may be put into use this week or next, according to the state Department of Water Resources. The oncoming storm is expected to raise the water level of Lake Oroville to 830 feet above sea level, which requires stepped-up releases to 14,500 cubic feet per second under DWR’s flood control plan for April. (more)


Late Winter Storms Bolster Snow-Pack in Sierra to 52% of Historical Average

From Dept. of Water Resources – Following one of the driest Februaries in California history, late winter storms increased the Sierra Nevada snowpack but were not enough to put the state on track for an average year. Today’s snow survey by the California Cooperative Snow Surveys Program indicates that water content in the statewide mountain snowpack increased from 23 percent of the March 1 average to 52 percent of today’s historical average. The early-April snow survey is the most important for water supply forecasting because the snowpack is normally at its peak before it begins to melt with rising spring temperatures.

(more from mavensnotebook.com)

 


Wildlife Conservation Board Funds Stream Flow Enhancement Projects

At a March 22 meeting, the Wildlife Conservation Board (WCB) approved approximately $33.1 million in grants for 22 projects to enhance stream flows to benefit fish and wildlife habitat throughout California. The Legislature appropriated funding for these projects as authorized by the Water Quality, Supply and Infrastructure Improvement Act of 2014 (Proposition 1). (more)

 

From Lake County News and Wildlife Conservation Board

 


California Mudslides: Where and Why They Happen

Parts of central and Southern California could be impacted by powerful mudslides this week, weather forecasters said, thanks to a massive atmospheric river that’s expected to hit the state late Tuesday. An atmospheric river, or a huge plume of subtropical moisture, could result in up to 5 inches of rain in coastal areas and valleys, and up to 10 inches of rain in foothills and mountains. (more…) By Madeline Farber | Fox News.


California Was In For One of the Driest Winters On Record. Then March Happened.

Heavy rain and snow is in the forecast for California this week including local areas that are at risk of mudslides because of recent wildfires. But there is an upside. All that precipitation is chipping away at a snow pack deficit in the Sierra Nevada mountains – the source of one-third of the state’s drinking water supply. December, January and February were unusually hot and dry. But March has been a different story. Since the beginning of the month, the Sierra snow pack has gone from 23 percent to 48 percent of average in terms of its snow to water equivalent. And more snow is on the way.  (more…). By Jacob Margolis, KPCC


Ocean Protection Council Adopts Updated Guidance on Sea-Level Rise

The Ocean Protection Council (OPC) today adopted the 2018 update of the State of California Sea-Level Rise Guidance, which provides bold, science-based guidance to help state and local governments analyze the risks associated with sea-level rise and incorporate sea-level rise into planning, permitting, and investment decisions. “Scientific understanding of sea-level rise is advancing at a rapid rate, and the latest data should be a concern to all Californians,” California Natural Resources Secretary and OPC Chair John Laird said. “Rising sea levels pose an immediate and real threat to lives, livelihoods, infrastructure, transportation, the economy and ecosystems in California, and our decisions must reflect that reality. We have an opportunity now to make smart, informed decisions that prepare our coastal and inland communities for change.” (more)